DINOSAUR magazine: Waters + WintersFebruary 5, 2015

posted in portraits

by Jim Winters

 

I am beyond elated to have been granted so much exposure in the latest issue of DINOSAUR magazine (volume 01, issue 03).

 

DINOSAUR magazine issue 3 cover

 

11 beautiful, large-format pages!

4 landscape screen prints from my 2011 Travelogue exhibition at Denison Univerisity are re-produced (San Francisco x2, Philadelphia and Berlin), along with an excerpt of the original essay by Gregory Nelson:

 

DINOSAUR magazine Jim Winters spread 1

DINOSAUR magazine Jim Winters spread 2

DINOSAUR magazine Jim Winters spread 3

 

Also included in the issue is an interview I conducted with film-maker, artist and personal hero/icon John Waters. The Q & A is accompanied by my screen print portraits of Divine, Liz Renay and Edith Massey as well as a portrait drawing of Mr. Waters:

 

DINOSAUR magazine John Waters by Jim Winters

DINOSAUR magazine John Waters by Jim Winters

 

It doesn’t get any better than this. I am grateful and honored to have my work out there in this format.

photo of Jim Winters by Steven Gdula

photo by Steven Gdula

 

Many, many thanks to Steven Gdula (publisher) and all of the crew at DINOSAUR.

Let’s do more projects together!

 
 

Read the online excerpt here.

Get your subscription here.

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Hello, 2015January 3, 2015

posted in portraits

by Jim Winters
 
This is the last image I made in 2014 – and the first in my new home studio.
 
5 color reduction screen print on watercolor paper
5″ x 7″
 

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Super Feature at KikiMay 1, 2014

posted in portraits

by Jim Winters

In the spring and summer of 1993 I was making screen printed vinyl stickers and putting them up around San Francisco with Gregory Nelson, my partner at the time – an enthusiastic slap tagger and my favorite art cohort. There were 4 initial images: Sparkling Clean, Super Feature, Gourmet Homestyle and Heavy Duty.

 

 

That June I went to a recently-opened (tiny), storefront space called The Kiki Gallery in the Mission and introduced myself to Rick Jacobsen, the gallery director, by giving him stickers of nurses. The first show he had mounted was called Caca at Kiki, (it was about feces). Rick had a great sense of humor and a love for the disturbing; he and Gregory and I bonded quickly.

 

 

Rick asked to see my other work and I invited him over for a studio visit. I was appropriating a lot of medical imagery from old textbooks and re-creating vintage illustrations of little boys faces. (Now I can see how clearly all these pieces stemmed from my own fear of AIDS at that time). Rick honed in right away – seeing humor within the horror – and offered me a solo exhibition. My first-ever solo show was to be Kiki’s second exhibition. The pieces in the show were a combination of vinyl stickers and screen prints on wood. The name Super Feature comes from a Walgreen’s advertising slogan that appeared on store placards (specifically the Walgreen’s in San Francisco’s Castro district at 18th and Castro).

 

 

During the short period I knew Rick we became good friends and I helped out at Kiki by screen printing signage, booklet covers and even the image on the Kikibox – a collection of small works by Kiki artists.

 

The Kiki Gallery lived a fast and furious 18 months and my work was subsequently included in two group shows: Bong! and Fanta. Many artists came out of this small gallery in San Francisco’s Mission district to become quite notable in larger art contexts. Some of my favorites are Chris Johanson, Rex Ray, Jerome Caja, D-L Alvarez, and Catherine Opie.

 

Rick ended up moving back home to Wisconsin to live after he became too ill to stay in San Francisco. He had closed the gallery in 1995. I was so unnerved by his getting sick that I didn’t go to say goodbye to him when he left (unnerved = young, stupid and afraid). At the time I hadn’t had many close friends become this ill (or die) and regret to this day not making the effort to connect one last time. He passed away in February 1997.

 

I miss you, Rick. You gave me the first opportunity to show my work in San Francisco and were one of my biggest champions. I thank you for that. I can’t help but wonder how things would have worked out (for all of us) had you been able to stick around longer.

 

 

In 2008, a show honoring Rick’s legacy entitled Kiki: The Proof Is In The Pudding was held at San Francisco’s Ratio 3 gallery.
You can read about it here.

 

Some reviews:
SF Weekly
Stretcher

 

San Francisco author, Kevin Killian, has done extensive writing about Rick and Kiki and earlier this month Dennis Cooper’s blog featured some of it.

 

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Ladies/GentlemenApril 12, 2014

posted in portraits

by Jim Winters

Attention Facebook users! I just uploaded an album of over 80 images encompassing 20 years of drag and transgender portraits.

Check it out here (click on the image):

Please feel free to ‘Like’ my Facebook business page:
jimwinters.com

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6 SkullsMarch 31, 2014

posted in still life

by Jim Winters

Last year when I was making my Vanitas reduction screen prints and film, and the small Memento Mori pieces, I looked at a lot of skull paintings. As I stated in a blog post at that time, I love Dutch still life paintings from the 16th and 17th centuries and the symbols of the Vanitas genre. While the skull motif has gained widespread popularity within contemporary culture, my searches revealed that it has always been a mainstay of the still life and a subject for artists for hundreds of years.

Vanitas as a theme refers specifically to the transient nature of life and the inevitability of death. Memento Mori means: “Remember that you will die.” These themes have been very close to my heart the past couple of years and as a subject for artwork they are especially significant.

These 6 interpretations of pieces by modern (and contemporary) masters are my homage to the genre and a personal exploration of this universal concept.

 

Inspiration-
Vincent Van Gogh, Skull, 1887(left)
My version-
Van Gogh 1887, 8 color reduction screen print on paper, 8”x 10”, 2014 (right)

 

Inspiration-
Paul Cézanne, Still Life with Skull (Nature morte au crane), 1895-1900 (left)
My version-
Cézanne 1900, 7 color reduction screen print on paper, 10”x 8”, 2014 (right)

 

Inspiration-
Pablo Picasso, Still Life with Skull, Leeks and Pitcher, 1945 (left)
My version-
Picasso 1945, 8 color reduction screen print on paper, 10”x 8”, 2014 (right)

 

Inspiration-
Andy Warhol, Skull, 1976 (left)
My version-
Warhol 1976, 5 color reduction screen print on paper, 10”x 8”, 2014 (right)

 

Inspiration-
Jean-Michel Basquiat, Untitled, 1982 (left)
My version-
Basquiat 1982, 6 color reduction screen print on paper, 8”x 10”, 2014 (right)

 

Inspiration-
Gerhard Richter, Skull with Candle (Schädel mit Kerze), 1983 (left)
My version-
Richter 1983, 7 color reduction screen print on paper, 10”x 8”, 2014 (right)

 
 

Promotional video for the 6 Skulls portfolio:

 
 

 

 

This portfolio is a limited edition of 25. They are available in my website shop.

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